For all too many Americans election day only comes every four years. By this they deny themselves their birthright. Elections are held every fall, and for most parts of our nation important electoral decisions are scattered throughout the year.

In a democracy I cannot escape a moral and spiritual responsibility to vote. If I view my government as the establishment of a den of iniquity I must reckon with the fact that I am a part of the electorate that established that government. Neither can I rationalize my failure to vote by arguing that among so many millions my single vote counts for nothing. I still must answer to God for my fraction of the total vote, and I must bear that much responsibility for the kind of government I get—good or bad.

Be sure to read the pro and con evaluations of President Carter’s moral leadership. (See pages 14 and 15.) One or the other (or both) may make you angry, but they will do you good.

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