Perhaps we all have, in some way, fallen short of the mark in our public engagement by permitting our convictions to race ahead of our thinking. By failing to grasp both the nature and the limits of politics, Christian activists were more easily beguiled by its promise. Disillusion was the inevitable consequence of wishful and naive presumption. Our inability to persuade our fellow citizens through compelling argument in the marketplace of ideas led to our reliance upon coercion and threats—weak instruments that cannot last. Don Eberly is right: concentrating on the politicians while ignoring the culture—and the public sentiment it shapes—is myopic and futile.

Kudos to all those who argue that we not quit the field but stay engaged. Our failure to do so a half-century ago abetted the cultural crisis.

Still, we must not only understand but embrace pluralism and diversity. We must come to see that, as Jefferson put it, "Every difference of opinion is not a difference in principle." Finally, we must encourage our children to enter politics as a noble and worthwhile vocation.

Jack Wyman
East Haddam, Conn.

Cal Thomas writes about iniquity in government. Yet, he believes Christian men and women of valor should re treat from the political battlefield and flee into spiritual noncombat zones. But this would suit Satan, who excels in ruling governments. America needs more warriors like James Dobson and fewer people blowing the bugle to retreat in the war for the nation's soul.

Gordon L. Cameron
Camano Island, Wash.

Since Pentecost, have Christians even a "moral majority"? If some of today's Religious Right are upset because everything doesn't go their way, may be they should take their marbles (what's left of them) and ...

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