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Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen

Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen
Our Rating
2½ Stars - Fair
Average Rating
 
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Mpaa Rating
PG (for mild thematic elements and brief language)
Directed By
Sara Sugarman
Run Time
1 hour 29 minutes
Cast
Lindsay Lohan, Adam Garcia, Glenne Headly, Alison Pill
Theatre Release
February 20, 2004 by Touchstone/Disney

"First your parents tell you to have hopes and dreams, then they move you to New Jersey. It makes no sense."

It's hard not to appreciate the predicament of Lola Cep, the Manhattan-born and bred drama queen who's spilling her guts in Disney's latest offering for tween girls, Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen. Lindsay Lohan, of recent Freaky Friday fame, plays the flamboyant Lola, a teenager chafing against her family's move from the Big Apple to the "cultural wasteland" of suburban New Jersey.

A quick survey of the plot goes like this: Nice girl Lola moves to New Jersey, where she picks up both a best friend, Ella, and an archenemy, Carla, within the first five minutes at her new high school. Lola and Ella bond over their mutual devotion to fictional rock band Sid Arthur, while Lola and Carla trade barbs and fight for the lead in the school play. When Sid Arthur announces it's splitting up after one last farewell concert in NYC, all three girls are desperate to go. Wackiness ensues, dreams come true—and we still have the big play coming up. The big play, by the way, is a modern adaptation of Pygmalion titled "Eliza Rocks"—and I have to admit that it does.

Director Sara Sugarman employs some creative devices to capture the fantasy world of our drama queen, and the movie frequently lapses into a quasi-animated state as Lola dreams about her future of fame and love. We're also treated to an animated sequence when Lola makes up a story about her father's death (via pizza delivery truck no less) in order to explain why her mom is single. When her very-much-alive father shows up later in the movie, Lola's lie threatens to destroy everything she so desperately wants—friendship and credit for being at the Sid Arthur ...

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