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G-Force

Another Disney family action-comedy with computer-animated animal agents—but G-Force is no Bolt.
G-Force
Our Rating
2 Stars - Fair
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Mpaa Rating
PG (some mild action and rude humor)
Directed By
Hoyt Yeatman
Run Time
1 hour 28 minutes
Cast
Bill Nighy, Will Arnett, Zach Galifianakis, Kelli Garner
Theatre Release
July 24, 2009 by Walt Disney Pictures

There's nothing wrong with G-Force that John Lasseter couldn't fix.

For that matter, the Pixar honcho, now head of Walt Disney Animation Studios, has already done this story right: It was called Bolt, and it was the first theatrical release from Disney Animation under Lasseter's watch (he also produced). If you missed Bolt in theaters last fall, it's well worth catching on DVD—particularly as a counterpoint to G-Force, which is pretty much the film that Bolt could have been if it were Disney as usual … which, thanks at least in part to Lasseter's absence, it wasn't.

Consider first the similarities. G-Force and Bolt are both 3-D family action-comedies centered on elite, high-tech, computer-animated animal agents. In both films, the agents are driven off the reservation by extenuating circumstances, where they team up with civilian animals (including a colorful pet hamster/gerbil type whose ancestry is said to include more ferocious species), face up to humbling discoveries regarding their belief in their own high-tech specialness, and ultimately decide that what really matters is the ones they love.

Both G-Force and Bolt feature hamster balls in high-octane action, flashy pyrotechnics and stereotyped 007-style villains who turn out to be not what they seem. Both are also first-time feature films from directors with no more than a single short to their names.

Yep, practically the same movie, with one tiny, crucial difference: In G-Force, the computer-animated heroes share the screen with live-action human beings in a real-world setting. Which means that G-Force is from Walt Disney Pictures, not Walt Disney Animation Studios. Which means Lasseter had nothing to do with it. In fact, where Bolt was produced by Lasseter, ...

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