Two recent films have played unexpected roles in raising awareness of political and religious practices in Iran that trap many women in cycles of oppression and violence.

Time magazine TV critic James Poniewozik recently blogged about Persepolis, a 2007 animated film based on a series of graphic novels by Marjane Satrapi about her childhood during the Iranian Revolution. Poniewozik noted that Satrapi provided a powerful representation of life in Iran at a significant moment for women's rights.

Then, this past weekend, The Stoning of Soraya M. debuted on 27 screens in the United States, earning $117,000. Based on a book by Iranian-French journalist Freidoune Sahebjam, the film tells the story of an Iranian woman stoned to death after being falsely accused of infidelity soon after the 1979 Iranian Revolution. Writer-director Cyrus Nowrasteh and actress Shohreh Aghdashloo are both Iranian.

Soraya M. is a story of injustice arising from religious and political systems in need of change, and has drawn comparisons to the story of Neda Agha-Soltan, the 26-year-old woman whose death in a Tehran demonstration over Iran's disputed elections was captured in a video shared worldwide.

"Before Neda, There Was Soraya M.," writes Politics Daily's Carl M. Cannon, who places the movie's story in a timeline of women in the media who have become the faces of Iranian oppression. He writes,

If you see this brilliant film, be prepared to be disturbed. You will also emerge with a newfound admiration for Shohreh Aghdashloo, the accomplished Iranian-American actress who plays Zahra, the aunt of Soraya, and the heroine of this film, and also for all the independent-minded women of Iran.

Jennifer S. Bryson, director of the Witherspoon Institute's Islam and ...

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