I'd never thought much about plastic surgery until 28 years ago, when my then 2-year-old son bit through an extension cord and burnt his mouth. Even though we had no insurance, my husband and I found a plastic surgeon who restored symmetry and proportion to our son's features. To have left our child's face distorted would have been unthinkable, and Christian friends supported our decision as parents.

Twenty years later, when I considered restoring symmetry and proportion to my body after a 70-pound weight loss, I received the opposite response among Christian friends; many questioned my motives and some my spiritual integrity. Cosmetic surgery was a pursuit of the vain and shallow, they told me, even though I desired the same restoration for myself that I had wanted for my son.

A seminary grad, I began investigating cosmetic surgery through a biblical lens, particularly a theology of beauty and the implications of cosmetic surgery in a postmodern, consumer-driven culture. I wrestled with my motives: What did I really believe I'd achieve through such surgery? Was the story I was telling myself about who I was and would be if I had surgery consistent with God's story for me? And what about stewardship? My husband was a Christian school administrator. Could we justify the expenditure?

In many ways, I saw myself as an unlikely candidate for cosmetic surgery—different from "other vain" women I envisioned. I was a Christian school teacher who didn't know another soul who'd had a cosmetic procedure. (If they had, they didn't talk about it until I came looking for them.) But I discovered on my journey that I was very much like thousands of other women—Christian and non-Christian—who seek cosmetic surgery. I wanted ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Posted: