Biblical scholars have yet to determine if the woman caught in adultery (John 8:1-11) was a sex addict. But Nashville-based clinical therapist Marnie Ferree says the woman's shame and social status make her an apt archetype for women struggling with sex addiction. For one, women sex addicts often face a double dose of shame because they believe they as women aren't supposed to have sexual sin. And because the number of female addicts is relatively small (expert Patrick Carnes estimates 3 percent of the U.S. population, with male addicts composing 8 percent), few books and recovery groups are available. "I tell some of my colleagues, such as Mark Laaser, 'you wrote a great book, but the pronouns are wrong,' " says Ferree.

Thankfully, the story of the adulterous woman in John's gospel reminds sex addicts that not even their deepest secret is outside Christ's healing touch. Ferree knows this from personal experience, because she is a recovering sex addict—something she hid for 20 years until an HPV diagnosis in 1990 brought it to light and kick-started her recovery. Today, alongside her husband of 29 years, Ferree runs Bethesda Workshops, which aims to provide "Christian treatment for sex addiction recovery." Their dramatic story appears in No Stones: Women Redeemed from Sexual Addiction, Ferree's immensely practical, deeply biblical book for female sex addicts, out this month from InterVarsity Press. Ferree spoke recently with Her.meneutics editor Katelyn Beaty.

What is sex addiction? How is it different from, say, porn addiction? There's no difference between porn addiction and sex addiction. Sex addiction is an umbrella term; the particular form of acting out, whether it's pornography, affairs, sex chat rooms, prostitutes, ...

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