Quotation Marks

Machine-gun preachers, dueling atheists, the Christian yoga firestorm, and other recent remarks in the church around the world.

"There's a competitive environment for 'no religion,' and they're grabbing for all the constituents they can get."
Mark Silk, director of the Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life, on the ad campaigns from four competing atheist groups over the holidays.
Source: The New York Times

"You may be twisting yourselves into pretzels or grasshoppers, but if there is no meditation or direction of consciousness, you are not practicing yoga."
Albert Mohler, after his online column on the incompatibility of yoga and Christianity caused a small firestorm. He says he was receiving e-mail responses at a rate of about 100 an hour.
Source: AlbertMohler.com

"You couldn't see the kid's face entering the front doors."
Joel Brodsky, divorce attorney for Joseph Reyes, who faced charges for taking his 3-year-old daughter to Mass, violating a court order barring him from exposing her to non-Jewish religion. Brodsky argued that the child in a news video was not clearly Reyes's daughter.
Source: Chicago Sun-Times

"People who get upset tend to be thinking of the God of the New Testament."
Sam Childers, self-described Christian mercenary and "machine gun preacher" who pastors a Pennsylvania church. Seven months a year he hunts Lord's Resistance Army head Joseph Kony and his followers around northern Uganda.
Source: St. Louis Post-Dispatch


Related Elsewhere:

Earlier Quotation Marks columns are available from November 2010, October 2010, September 2010, August 2010, July 2010, June 2010, May 2010, April 2010, March 2010, February 2010, January 2010, December 2009, November 2009, October 2009, September 2009, August 2009, July 2009, June 2009, May 2009, April 2009, and earlier issues of Christianity Today.

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