"Jesus was a rebel" is a favorite slogan of Christian pastors and authors trying to "reach twentysomethings," as they say. The logic? 1) Young people think Christianity is tired, boring, stale. 2) Young people are naturally rebellious and contrarian. Therefore … 3) Maybe Christianity will be fresh and exciting to them if it is framed in the context of subversion and rebellion.

But I'm not so sure that's a sound syllogism.

It's not a stretch to say that Jesus was a rebel. He was. He was bucking the system, turning over tables, and saying all sorts of subversive things in the days when he was walking the earth. It is perfectly appropriate, then, for Christians to call Jesus a rebel or a subversive. And it certainly fits neatly into any sort of a "Christianity is hip" PR ambition a church might be undertaking. Hipsters love rebels, and even if they loathe church or Christians, most of them still think Jesus is pretty dang cool.

When I asked Eric Bryant, a pastor at Mosaic in L.A., why Jesus is still considered cool in the eyes of young people, he said this:

They're intrigued by Jesus. They look to him. He is real, authentic, relevant. He spoke with honesty. He was a man on a mission. He was a radical, a revolutionary, yet tender and kind and loving. He was doing things completely against the rules of the day. He was a mix of justice, kindness, judgment and grace.

But one's man's rebel is another man's square. The phrase "Jesus was a rebel" means different things to different people. Some tend to play up the "judgment" side of things, imagining a warrior Jesus in the vein of Mark Driscoll's infamous "Jesus is a prizefighter with a tattoo down His leg" portrait. Others, like the Shane Claibornes of the world, emphasize the ...

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