"How long am I to remain in this relationship?" This is the haunting question 65-year-old Glenda Crosley asks in the documentary Sin by Silence about the abusive husband she killed in 1986. She has been in prison for as long as she was married—24 years—and wonders when her ordeal will be over.

In the film, shot almost entirely inside the California Institution for Women, Crosley says the first time her husband, Sam, "truly got physical" was when she was eight months pregnant with their second child. He shoved her into a wall. Eventually she came to believe that the violence wouldn't end until one of them was dead. According to The Bakersfield Californian, at the time of Sam's murder, the couple was separated and having an argument in a parking lot. When Sam walked away from her car to the trunk of his, she believed he was going to get the tire iron he had threatened her with the week before. She rammed him once, drove away, then turned her car and hit him again. He died at the scene.

Elizabeth Leonard is the author of Convicted Survivors and a professor at Vanguard University, a Christian college in Costa Mesa, California. She says in the film that women who leave abusive relationships are often subject to "separation assault" and are 75 percent more likely to be murdered than before they left. So the answer to the question: Why didn't she just leave? is not a simple one. In the same 2009 Bakersfield Californian article, Crosley's daughter Stacy is quoted as saying she remembers her mother trying to leave several times and each of them ending with her father's rage. She even blames herself for her father's death because one of the times her mother returned was because a judge wouldn't release her from a group home ...

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