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Harry Potter, Jesus, and Me

Wherever we see beauty, light, truth, goodness, we see Christ—even in a story about a boy wizard.
Harry Potter, Jesus, and Me
Image: Astrid Stawiarz / Getty Images

Editor's note: This essay from Christian musician Andrew Peterson is abridged from a blog post at The Rabbit Room.

I'm a fan of the Harry Potter books. There. I said it. Whenever I visit a bookstore I can't resist a walk through the Young Readers section, where my heart flutters at cover illustrations of dragons and detectives and ghosts and kids dashing across fantastic landscapes. I've always loved those stories, and many times I take the books from the shelves and, with chills running up and down my arms, thumb through them. Sometimes I even smell them. (There. I said that, too.)

Years ago, on one of my trips through the kids' section I noticed a book called Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. It looked cool, and the jacket indicated that it had won a few awards. A year or so later I saw the second book, this one on display. By the time I spotted Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban on the shelves the buzz was loud enough that I decided to buy the first book. I read it, and although it had some great moments, I wasn't hooked. But at the time I was writing On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness and was learning so much so quickly about writing, I already knew North! Or Be Eaten would be a better book. I desperately hoped my readers would stick with me through my first faltering attempt at fiction because I had a much bigger story to tell.

So I decided to give this "J.K. Rowling" person the benefit of the doubt, as I hoped my readers would do for me. I read Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets and liked it better than the first book. I began to get glimpses of the scope of this story, sensed a gigantic framework beneath its surface, and bought Harry Potter and the Prisoner of ...

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