Virginia Breen's daughter, Elizabeth, seemed to be thriving like any other infant: walking and smiling, her eyes bright and cheery. Then within one week, Elizabeth mysteriously stopped speaking, and shortly thereafter was diagnosed with autism. But for the past seven years, the 14-year-old has been "talking" through writing, mostly through poetry. Her writing is featured in I Am in Here (Baker), which is the story of Breen, a Christian, relentlessly advocating for her child, discovering her child's compassion for others, and researching ways to help Elizabeth overcome "the shadow of autism."

Breen, who recently spoke about Elizabeth's autism and poetry at TEDMED in April, talked to me about common myths about autism and what she has learned about God through Elizabeth's vibrant faith.

Through the years in which Elizabeth couldn't speak or use a letterboard, how did you know that she wanted to communicate?

Despite the turmoil of autism, there were times when Elizabeth would look into my eyes and blink slowly and deliberately, like a stroke victim to show me that although she could not speak, she understood what I was saying to her. This didn't happen often, but it drove me to find a way for her to break free from her "silent cage." Finally, when Elizabeth was 6, we found Soma Mukhopadhyay in Austin, Texas. She developed the Rapid Prompting Method (RPM) and taught her own nonverbal son to communicate with it. Soma has freed Elizabeth and more than 1,000 children and adults with RPM.

What have you learned about faith from Elizabeth?

Elizabeth has taught me … about keeping faith alive in the midst of life's challenges and focusing on what is important. Despite not being able to speak or control her body, she is joyful and ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Posted: