1987 called. It wants its tissue box cover back. You know the one, made by hand in colonial blue and dusty rose calico.

Author David Murrow appears to have found the final resting place of this artifact in the churches he's visited. He excerpted a section from his book, How Women Help Men Find God, in a blog post entitled "Does Your Church Look Like A Beauty Parlor?", describing the country-folksy décor in some small and mid-sized church buildings:

As I speak in churches, I notice the beauty salon motif everywhere. Quilted banners and silk flower arrangements adorn church lobbies. More quilts, banners, and ribbons cover the sanctuary walls, complemented with fresh flowers on the altar, a lace doily on the Communion table, and boxes of Kleenex under every pew.

I've never been inside a beauty salon like that, but I have seen enough churches adorned with the discards from fading home decorating trends to picture the dated décor in women's bathrooms, lobbies, and sanctuary spaces of various older churches.

Murrow contends that girly décor in a church building is off-putting to men. Well, it's off-putting to many women, too.

In the Old Testament, the tabernacle, then the temple, were entirely other and completely different than the homes of his people. That is to say, no one would bring in the ancient equivalent of a toilet paper cover or wall-hanging to adorn such a holy place.

God himself prescribed the design of these buildings to show his people what he was like and how they could worship him. These holy sanctuaries were "a copy and shadow of what is in heaven" (Heb. 8:5), serving as the spiritual home for his people until in the fullness of time, Jesus ...

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