What We're Really Debating This Campaign Season

It's time to acknowledge America's ideals and failures.
What We're Really Debating This Campaign Season
Image: Patrick Semansky / AP Images
American Exceptionalism and Civil Religion: Reassessing the History of an Idea
Our Rating
4 Stars - Excellent
Book Title
American Exceptionalism and Civil Religion: Reassessing the History of an Idea
Author
Publisher
IVP Academic
Release Date
December 22, 2015
Pages
263
Price
$21.00
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Heading into the thick of the 2016 presidential campaign season, we’ve heard plenty from the candidates about the meaning and purpose of America. Donald Trump, to take an especially colorful example, is fond of issuing forceful, if somewhat vague, promises to “make America great again.”

Which implies, of course, that America has been great in the past—and that, by one reckoning or another, it ought to be great once more. But even that leaves many questions unanswered. What does it mean for a nation to be great? And is national greatness—even if we could agree on a consensus definition—really something to be prized?

It won’t surprise anyone familiar with our campaign-season squabbles—much less our fractious, rambunctious national history—that the answers to these questions are anything but settled and uncontroversial. As a guide through this tangle of issues, we’re fortunate to have John D. Wilsey, author of an excellent new study called American Exceptionalism and Civil Religion: Reassessing the History of an Idea. Wilsey, who teaches history and apologetics at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, asks how faithful Christians can think through the claims—popular throughout our history—that America is an “exceptional” nation, blessed by God and given a unique role in to play in world affairs.

God and America

At least one conclusion is clear: most citizens affirm some kind of relationship between God and America. Polling numbers show that even today, in a nation wracked by the forces of globalism, big banks, terror plots, gun violence, and racial tensions—not to mention the effects of seemingly irreversible climate change—roughly ...

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