The best resource for understanding any writer is his own works, and with a writer as prolific as MacDonald you will not be lacking in reading material for a very long time. For an initial taste of his diverse output, start with Rolland Hein's anthology, The Heart of George MacDonald (1994; Regent, 2004), which includes sermons, poems, fiction, letters, and MacDonald's two essays on imagination. C. S. Lewis's George MacDonald: An Anthology offers an array of excerpts from MacDonald's Unspoken Sermons, and Glenn Sadler has edited a collection of his letters, An Expression of Character (Eerdmans, 1994).

MacDonald's fantasies and fairy tales are readily available in several modern editions. For the most historically accurate picture of MacDonald, I recommend reading his novels, sermons, and other writings in their original, unabridged form.The complete set of MacDonald's works is published by Johannesen Printing & Publishing (www.johannesen.com). Don't overlook the collection of spoken sermons, George MacDonald in the Pulpit, edited by J. Flynn and D. Edwards (the source of the excerpt on p. 31). There is also a centenary edition of MacDonald's novels published by Sunrise Books.

Wingfold, a quarterly magazine edited by Barbara Amell, reprints rare material by and about George MacDonald (http://pages.prodigy.net/b_amell/wingfold1.html).

The voluminous archives of the Marion E. Wade Center in Wheaton, IL (http://www.wheaton.edu/learnres/wade/) include books and papers relating to George MacDonald, G.K. Chesterton, C. S. Lewis, Dorothy Sayers, J. R. R. Tolkien, Owen Barfield, and Charles Williams. The center also publishesSEVEN: An Anglo-American Literary Review.

Robert Trexler has produced a wonderful resource by putting the original ...

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