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Martin Luther King wrong? CT is committed to building bridges between communities, and that means dealing with ideas that push us beyond our comfort zones. White Christians are familiar with King's prophetic integrationist vision, but there has always been another strand within the black community and church. Eugene Rivers articulates that other strand, calling for a Christian black nationalism. We are committed to listening to voices within the black community (as well as other underrepresented faith communities). Recently we profiled Gardner Taylor and Glenn Loury; in the next issue, black church leaders address problems facing the urban church; in April, we report on America's fastest-growing denomination: the Church of God in Christ. We hope these articles will foster increased understanding and help Christians realize the reconciliation achieved in Christ's Cross.

Some 30 or 40 worshipers shuffled in on Sunday morning to the basement of Freedom House, a community center in inner-city Boston that is part of Azusa Christian Community. The "altar" (a folding table draped with a brightly colored African linen) was circled by three rows of folding chairs on which had been placed, on alternating chairs, NIV study Bibles. There was no bulletin. The worship songs were familiar choruses, raucously profferred--the love of King Jesus was "tumblin' down" that morning.

"Julian" (not his real name) came in and sat down nervously, clutching his Bible. His gold earring jumped out like the exclamation point to his shaved head. His sweater glowed white, and his crisp white pants almost crackled when he sat down.

Julian asked for prayer for his Jewish neighbor during the prayer time. "Yes, Lord. He's my buddy, Lord," he repeated, throughout ...

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February 5, 1996

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