Pulpit King Gardner Taylor Dies at 96

The legend among preachers was known for his passion and eloquence.
Pulpit King Gardner Taylor Dies at 96
Image: Gerry Broome / AP Images
1995This article is part of CT's digital archives. Subscribers have access to all current and past issues, dating back to 1956.

Gardner Taylor, one of America's best-known and most-respected preachers, died Easter Sunday, April 5. He retired in 1990 from Concord Baptist Church of Christ in Brooklyn, New York, after serving there for 42 years. In 1995, Christianity Today sent Ed Gilbreath to New York to profile the pastor.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, the “Prince of Preachers,” summed up his philosophy of preaching this way: “Above all, [the preacher] must put heart work into his preaching. He must feel what he preaches. It must never be with him an easy thing to deliver a sermon. He must feel as if he could preach his very life away before the sermon is done.” Gardner C. Taylor knows something about this kind of preaching. For more than 50 years he has “preached his life away.” In 1980, Time named him “the dean of the nation’s black preachers,” and in a recent issue of The Christian Century, he was dubbed the “poet laureate of American Protestantism.”

“Gardner Taylor is a consummate communicator,” says William Pannell, professor of preaching at Fuller Theological Seminary in Southern California. Timothy George, dean of Samford University’s Beeson Divinity School, concurs: “More than anybody else I have heard in my life, Gardner Taylor combines eloquence and passion in the endeavor of preaching.”

As pastor of the 14,000-member Concord Baptist Church of Christ, Taylor, 77, labored as shepherd and prophet in Brooklyn’s rugged Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood for 42 years until his retirement in 1990. Today, as Concord’s pastor emeritus, Taylor is called upon to fill pulpits, give lectures, and provide keynote addresses at churches and educational ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

From Issue:
July/August
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
More from this IssueRead This Issue
Read These Next
close