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The Magazine

May 22, 2000Volume 44, Number 6
May 22
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Table of Contents
Why secular scientists and media can't admit that Darwinism might be wrong.
Scopes-trial historian Ed Larson explains why Christians should be taught evolution.
Evolution's significance for theology has been greatly exaggerated.
Hollywood looks at itself in the mirror of the Messiah.
A review of The Epic Miniseries
My husband was more whole on his deathbed than at any other time in his life.
Former professional wrestlers confront this multimillion-dollar industry's dark side.
A church pianist by day, Deanna Witkowski lights up the New York jazz scene by night.
Piety in public may help students understand America's religious diversity.
Third World debt is as vicious as the slave trade.
Even in churches, many believers feel safer ignoring those they don't know.
Some Christian writers have said slavery in America was divinely sanctioned because it helped bring Africans to Christ. Is this true?
You're not alone if you don't.
A journalist makes a case for Scripture's reliability.
Recent and important releases that will shape evangelical thought.
God brings victory even from our bad moves.
Despite layoffs and low income, the decade-old men's movement marches on.
Evangelicals join protests against genetically modified frankenfoods.
Can homosexuals and atheists be barred from church camps?
Hell Isn't Obsolete, Brits Say
Maverick conservatives gain a toehold among Episcopalians.
States' legislation unconstitutional, say leaders.
With Elián returned to his father, Cuban Christians say he should come home. Are they being honest, or fearful of reprisals?
Christian business leaders preach economic engagement to expedite reform. But others are leery.
Following cultic deaths of 900, independent Christian groups in Uganda come under a cloud of mistrust and fear.
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The Softer Face of Calvinism
The Softer Face of Calvinism
Reformed theology is more irenic and diverse than you think, says theologian Oliver Crisp.