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The Notebook
Our Rating
3 Stars - Good
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Mpaa Rating
PG-13 (for some sexuality)
Directed By
Nick Cassavetes
Run Time
2 hours 3 minutes
Cast
Tim Ivey, Gena Rowlands, Starletta DuPois, James Garner
Theatre Release
June 25, 2004 by New Line Cinema

This engaging, intergenerational love story is based on the best-selling novel by Nicholas Sparks, who also wrote A Walk to Remember. Sparks's novel rests in good hands with this fine adaptation by Jeremy Leven and Jan Sardi. Leven's credits include The Legend of Bagger Vance and Don Juan DeMarco. Like those films, The Notebook retains the same gentle tone, thoughtfully and respectfully developing characters of depth and dignity. Sardi, meanwhile, is best known for Shine!, the delightfully quirky story of an eccentric Australian pianist. She brings the same energy to The Notebook, capturing the unique world of 1940s South Carolina.

Rachel McAdams and Ryan Gosling as a young Allie and Noah

Rachel McAdams and Ryan Gosling as a young Allie and Noah

The Notebook begins with an unlikely romance between a young woman from Southern aristocracy, and a blue-collar boy who works at the mill. Noah provides the spontaneity and joy that is missing from Allie's relentless climb up the social ladder. She's off to a classy college and he's looking at a proscribed life of honest, physical labor. In Allie's vivacity and intelligence Noah finds an intellectual and emotional challenge that is missing in his life. Despite the vast differences in wealth and possibilities, both Noah and Allie live lives stifled and defined by class and convention.

A parallel plot takes place between two elderly residents of a nursing home, where Duke (James Garner) reads a romantic novel to a woman suffering from Alzheimer's. She forgets who he is, and forgets that he has been reading to her every day, but once the narrative begins she starts to remember, or at least feel, her life. At times she has clear, but agonizingly brief moments of memory. The staff and Duke's family feel he is wasting his time, but he finds spiritual meaning in the daily interaction. He expects little ...

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