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Ted Haggard's recent request for money to keep his family afloat while he attends school was "inappropriate" and "unacceptable," according to a statement Wednesday by the group that oversees the former president of the National Association of Evangelicals.

Haggard had e-mailed a Colorado Springs television station a letter requesting financial help while he studies for his master's degree. He also said he was planning to move to the Phoenix Dream Center, a half-way house for the homeless, those coming out of prison recovering alcoholics, drug addicts and prostitutes. "I can identify," he said in the letter.

The letter implied that he would be doing ministry there, but the overseer's statement said Haggard will not be moving in or working with the Dream Center.

"It was never the intention of the Dream Center that Mr. Haggard would provide any counsel or other ministry," the statement said. "He will be seeking secular employment to support himself and his family."

Haggard said Thursday that he could not speak with the CT about the statement.

The four-pastor team of overseers was assigned to help Haggard after he was removed from New Life Church in Colorado Springs last November. A former male prostitute told a radio station that he and Haggard had a three-year sexual relationship and that Haggard had used methamphetamine. Haggard later said he had bought drugs and admitted to "sexual immorality."

After he left New Life, the church gave Haggard a severance package that included a year's salary of $138,000. He also owns a home for sale in Colorado Springs valued at $715,051, according to records from the county assessor.

In the recent letter soliciting money, Haggard said that if supporters want a tax deduction for their gift, they ...

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