Guest / Limited Access /

Like any good major-league pitcher, Frank Pastore knows how to bring the heat. He played eight years in the bigs, recording his best season in 1980 (13-9, 3.57 ERA) with the Cincinnati Reds. Today, he's the face of Salem's Los Angeles station KKLA and host of the number-one local Christian talk show in the country.

An unashamed, take-no-prisoners conservative, Pastore throws out sound bites like fastballs:

• "I'm sorry, but abortion is murder, and murder on a moral plane is more severe than dealing with the poor."

• "Jim Wallis and Tony Campolo … are pawns being played by the political Left."

• "I'm not a compassionate conservative. Compassionate conservatism is a euphemism for, 'We are never going to cut spending, but we will continue to hold taxes flat.'"

Listeners to Pastore's show, tagged "the intersection of faith and reason," are as likely to hear a discussion of Snoop Dogg's latest arrest as a spirited debate between Pastore and National Council of Churches president the Rev. Michael Livingston.

But Pastore is clearly most energized by politics. After injuries derailed his big-league career, Pastore earned degrees in philosophy of religion from Talbot Theological Seminary and political philosophy and government from Claremont Graduate School. He isn't shy about his opinions, and he expects the same forthrightness from his guests.

"They should be out front," Pastore says of his left-leaning interview subjects. "[They should say], 'We are socialists. We want taxes to be higher. We believe the United States should not use military force.'"

As much as he enjoys the back-and-forth of hosting an interview-driven program—the competitiveness of crafting arguments and taking names—Pastore is seeking to ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Read These NextSee Our Latest
RecommendedThe Right Way to Think About Giving to the Poor
The Right Way to Think About Giving to the Poor
Theologian Gary Anderson shows how acts of charity embody faith in the goodness of God and his creation.
TrendingMark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
Mark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
"I do not want to be the source of anything that might detract from our church’s mission."
Editor's PickYou Need a More Ordinary Jesus
You Need a More Ordinary Jesus
We are united with a Christ who seems not to have done much of note for most of his life.
Comments
Christianity Today
Striking Out the Liberals
hide thisFebruary February

In the Magazine

February 2007

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.