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How Maya Moore Brings Style and Grace to the U.S. Olympic Women's Team
Image: 2011 NBAE
How Maya Moore Brings Style and Grace to the U.S. Olympic Women's Team

It's amazing what you can learn about a person in 140 characters or less.

Take the Twitter page of Maya Moore. Her mini-bio at the top is a good place to start:

Basketball player, daughter, & drummer. Friend & red velvet cake lover.

So few words, so much meaning.

Basketball player. And how! The youngest member of the U.S. Olympic team—now in London for the 2012 Games—Moore, 23, is not only one of the world's best but perhaps the winningest. Ever. Since ninth grade, the 6-foot forward has played almost 400 games, winning 97 percent of them. That includes three high-school state titles, two NCAA championships and a 90-game win streak at the University of Connecticut (as a two-time national player of the year), a WNBA crown with the Minnesota Lynx as the league's rookie of the year, and most recently, a EuroLeague championship with a pro team in Valencia, Spain. Now she hopes to add Olympic gold to the list.

Daughter. Moore can't say enough about her mother, Kathryn, who "has helped me to grow into a smart young woman who keeps things in perspective." Kathryn taught her only child—named after Maya Angelou—the value of faith, family, and hard work. When Moore was 11, Kathryn and her daughter left the comfort of extended family in Jefferson City, Missouri, and moved to Charlotte, North Carolina, where Kathryn was starting a new job. "It was a hard, lonely time," Maya tells Christianity Today, remembering how middle-school kids mocked her height—she towered over everyone—and her size 13 shoes.

"It was tough," she says. "My mom and I had to figure out how to do things on our own. Like, were we going to go to church because we'd ...

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How Maya Moore Brings Style and Grace to the U.S. Olympic Women's ...
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