Abortions Fall to Lowest Level in 10 Years

CDC finds all three measures of abortion–number, rate, and ratio–lower in 2009 than in 2000.

Tough economic times may be responsible for America's declining abortion rate, which is at a 10-year low.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported last week that the rate and number of abortions performed in the United States fell by 5 percent in 2009, the most recent year for which data is available. According to the CDC, this represents "the largest single-year decrease" for legal, induced abortions since 2000.

"The abortion rate for 2009 was 15.1 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15 to 44 years and the abortion ratio was 227 abortions per 1,000 live births," CDC reported. The report also states that slightly more than 16 percent of all abortions were medical abortions.

Abortion rates have been declining since the early 2000s, but the rate of decrease appears to have peaked at the height of the economic recession.

New state-level laws restricting access to abortion likely have not contributed to the decline. Many of these laws took effect within the last two years, and ...

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