Jump directly to the content
The Quest for a Bigger, Better, Cuter PregnancyMeringue Bake Shop / Flickr
The Quest for a Bigger, Better, Cuter Pregnancy

The Quest for a Bigger, Better, Cuter Pregnancy


Mar 12 2013
In an age of gender reveal cakes and ultrasound parties, it's not enough to just be pregnant anymore.

Finding your baby's gender is a time filled with anticipation, wonder, and, these days, party planning. The commercialization of pregnancy is at it again: A whole culture and industry has emerged to celebrate the big gender reveal. There are portable ultrasound machines that can be brought right to the living room, storefront 4D ultrasound boutiques, cakes with pink or blue inside to indicate the gender of the baby, and parties dedicated to revealing "It's a boy!" or "It's a girl!" to family and friends.

Thanks to advances in ultrasound technology, couples discover more information than ever about their babies before they are born. Just months ago, my husband and I excitedly waited to get a peek of our twin boys in utero, so I know how special it can be to see sonogram pictures, listen to the little heartbeats, and learn about your babies.

There is nothing wrong with wanting to see your baby up close and personal or wanting to share the gender of your child in a fresh and innovative way. As Christians, celebrating a baby from the earliest days of gestation only solidifies our commitment to being pro-life. I love seeing ultrasound pictures of my friends' babies. I love the suspense and surprise of gender reveal celebrations. I love a good party, and what better reason to celebrate than announcing the news of your baby's gender?

As a mother-to-be, though, I found myself disappointed when I couldn't reveal our bundles of joy in the extravagant ways I saw everyone else doing it on Facebook and Pinterest. (We didn't want to spend money throwing a gender reveal party, plus our parents live far away and wouldn't have been able to make it anyway.)

Somehow, it's not enough just to be pregnant anymore. Mommies-to-be want more: a clever, cutesy themed party, a decked out nursery, or one of a dozen other ideas pinned onto their inspiration boards. While these things can be fun and exciting for new parents, they're also more ways we all feel pressured to yet again keep up with everyone else.

On social media, we are exposed to the inner lives—and pregancies—of our friends, pseudo-friends, and celebrities in ways we never have seen before. Update after update, picture after picture, this window into their lives can foster disappointment, comparison, judgment, or expectation from those who choose not to be so forthcoming about their big news.

Even Kim Kardashian, who isn't shy about publicity, initially chose not to reveal the gender of her own baby—and faced some criticism over it. And the world is waiting to hear if Kate Middleton's little heir to the throne will be a girl, as speculated. In a lot of ways our ability to know more about a pregnancy has made us feel entitled to that information.

To add a comment you need to be a registered user or Christianity Today subscriber.

orSubscribeor
More from Her.menutics
Stockpiling Treasures in My Junk Closet

Stockpiling Treasures in My Junk Closet

How I got rid of 1,000 things and finally found shalom.
Even on Thanksgiving, It’s Okay to Ask for More

Even on Thanksgiving, It’s Okay to Ask for More

How our requests to God can actually fuel our gratefulness.
Waiting on Thankfulness

Waiting on Thankfulness

How God works in us during times when we can’t muster gratitude.
The Missing Voice in the Adoption Conversation

The Missing Voice in the Adoption Conversation

How our language would change if we heard more from adoptees.
Include results from Christianity Today
Browse Archives:

So Hot Right Now

Not All Vulnerability Is Brave

We don’t have to expose our deepest secrets with every speech and blog post.

What We're Reading

CT eBooks and Bible Studies

Christianity Today
The Quest for a Bigger, Better, Cuter Pregnancy