In college, my philosophy professor used to talk with affection about how his wife “schooled” him when they were first married. After hearing a Christian speaker on campus, he came home inspired and shared with his wife the speaker’s message: that life was all about big moments, and all the in-between stuff was just leading up to those climactic, world-changing events.

After he finished downloading, she looked at him with an eyebrow raised and said, “Sounds like a man. Men love to talk about ‘quality time’ and ‘high moments,’ but when you get up at 2 a.m. to change the sheets because our daughter threw up in bed, that’s living. When you have to change diapers for the 1,000th time, that’s living. All our time is ‘living.’”

I have the same response to the New Radical movement, led by David Platt and other pastors, which rallies western Christians to leave behind the ease of 21st-century living and return to the iconoclast vision of the early church. (See Christianity Today's Here Come the Radicals). The New Radicals mean no harm. In fact, they mean great good. They want justice. They want change. They want complacent Christians pushed out of their comfort zones and into the slums of a suffering world. What's wrong with that?

Here’s what: Their vision has the potential to leave suburban moms looking like lazy Christians. It's driven by a stereotypically male way of thinking that often values the dramatic over the mundane and loses sight of people who engage the greater good through the invisible monotony of home-making, childrearing, and other unseen acts of service. Men and women alike pine to make an impact—it’s human ...

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