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Food for Thought - Feb 11 2008

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A look at current social trends bears out the experience of churches: today's women are complex. Studying these trends also provides information that can help churches design effective women's ministries.

Consider just two trends that affect most church ministries:

1.Women working outside the home. Because women working outside the home have less time to participate, they often opt to attend events that include family members rather than participate in activities strictly for women.

2. Women's quest for content and spirituality. Sherry Stahly, coordinator of women's ministries for the Rocky Mountain Conservative Baptist Association, developed a Needs Assessment Survey to identify churched women's concerns. Initial results show an increased interest in spirituality. She comments, "The survey assesses needs in areas such as self-esteem, emotions, parenting skills, and relationships. The responses we've collected thus far show the greatest interest lies in personal spiritual growth."

Pat Wilson verifies this: "I'm finding that whether the woman works outside or inside the home, she wants something challenging to ponder. She doesn't want something ?just for fun' or entertainment; she wants programs that offer something meaningful."

Excerpted from an article in Ministry for Today's Women, a downloadable resource from Gifted For Leadership.

February11, 2008 at 10:03 AM

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