Guest / Limited Access /

Once in a while, we agree with the atheists. The latest occasion is the release of a new study on religion.

In 2007, the John Templeton Foundation made an award of £1.87 million to the University of Oxford for the Cognition, Religion, and Theology Project. The project sought to improve the scientific and philosophical rigor of the study of religion. As the web page announcing the study put it, "Both missions were accomplished with goals exceeded."

The study affirmed the familiar and uncovered a few surprises, such as:

  • "Children and adults have a tendency to see the natural world as having function or purpose—even those with advanced scientific education."
  • "In early childhood we have a natural tendency to attribute super properties to other humans and gods, including super knowledge, super perception, and immortality."
  • "Adolescents and young adults may find religious ideas easier to remember and use than older adults."
  • "Religious beliefs and practices might persist in part because they make us more cooperative and generous with others."

A number of media outlets trumpeted the story, many of them treating the obvious as news. The opening of CNN's story read, "Religion comes naturally, even instinctively, to human beings, a massive new study of cultures all around the world suggests."

Then again, this hasn't been obvious to some. The secularization theory—that as societies modernize and become more scientific, people will become less religious—has held sway for nearly 200 years in Western intellectual circles. Now we have another study from perhaps the most respected academic institution in the world that says religion is not only here to stay, but is built into the very fabric of human existence.

As we might ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Tags:
From Issue:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
RecommendedWhat Americans Pray For and Against (Per Max Lucado's LifeWay Survey)
What Americans Pray For and Against (Per Max Lucado's LifeWay Survey)
Research reveals top topics and how often people say prayers are answered.
TrendingNew Poll Finds Evangelicals’ Favorite Heresies
New Poll Finds Evangelicals’ Favorite Heresies
Survey finds many American evangelicals hold unorthodox views on the Trinity, salvation, and other doctrines.
Editor's PickSaying Goodbye for Good
Saying Goodbye for Good
How to bid farewell as though our bodies mattered.
Comments
Christianity Today
Good Religion, Bad Religion
hide thisAugust August

In the Magazine

August 2011

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.