Guest / Limited Access /
In Time
Our Rating
3 Stars - Good
Average Rating
 
(5 user ratings)ADD YOURSHelp
Mpaa Rating
PG-13 (for violence, some sexuality and partial nudity, and strong language)
Directed By
Andrew Niccol
Run Time
1 hour 49 minutes
Cast
Justin Timberlake, Olivia Wilde, Shyloh Oostwald, Johnny Galecki
Theatre Release
October 28, 2011 by New Regency Pictures

The most frightening, and eerily timely, image in In Time comes near the end, when we see signs of a certain kind of trouble spreading throughout the world—a danger that is no longer merely threatening, but has actually arrived. It's a sign of the times that threatens to turn the film from a nifty thriller into an unintentionally obtuse message-movie.

And that's a shame, because that message isn't what the film is all about. This is a movie about time. "I don't have time. I don't have time to tell you how it happened," lead character Will Salas (Justin Timberlake) says in an opening voiceover. The situation is that money has been literally replaced by time. Humans have been genetically modified to live 25 years. On your 25th birthday you stop aging, and you start dying. On your forearm is a row of 13 digital spaces, blinking green numerals, that indicate how many years, days, seconds you have left. The countdown begins, and after one year's grace period, you must find a way to earn every minute of life to come. Otherwise you "time out"—you die.

Will lives in a working-class district in Dayton. Each day he has to find a way to earn enough hours to live one more day; as he says, "I want to wake up with more time on my hands than there are hours in the day." The re-assigned meanings of almost any story about time are just one of the ways this time-based economy has been cleverly thought through. There are "Minutemen" who mug and rob unwary citizens (time is exchanged by clasping wrists together), "Timekeepers" who enforce the law and "keep the clock running," and "time zones" separating the rich from the poor. Someone born with a silver watch on his wrist is said to "come from time," rather than "come from money." ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Tags:
Browse All Movie Reviews By:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Current IssueWilson's Bookmarks
Subscriber Access Only Wilson's Bookmarks
From John Wilson, editor of Books & Culture.
Current IssueThe Church’s Integrity in the Trump Years
Subscriber Access Only
The Church’s Integrity in the Trump Years
It begins by recognizing the name above every name.
RecommendedScorsese’s ‘Silence’ Asks What It Really Costs to Follow Jesus
Scorsese’s ‘Silence’ Asks What It Really Costs to Follow Jesus
Martin Scorsese adapts Shusaku Endo’s acclaimed novel about faith, mission, and suffering.
Trending‘Worst Year Yet’: The Top 50 Countries Where It’s Hardest to Be a Christian
‘Worst Year Yet’: The Top 50 Countries Where It’s Hardest to Be a Christian
Islamic extremism now has a rival, according to 2017 World Watch List.
Editor's PickLatasha Morrison: The Church Is the ‘Only Place Equipped to Do Racial Reconciliation Well’
Latasha Morrison: The Church Is the ‘Only Place Equipped to Do Racial Reconciliation Well’
The founder of Be the Bridge reveals her vision for solving America's race problem.
Christianity Today
In Time
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

October 2011

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.