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Cornelia Duryée Moore's story sounds like something from a fairy tale.

"I got hit in the head with my godmother's magic wand, and she said, 'Hello, Corrie—this is what you're going to do for the rest of your life!' So I said, 'Yes, please!'"

To be more specific, Moore's godmother—Madeleine L'Engle, author of science-fiction novels (including A Wrinkle in Time and her popular Time Quartet) and inspirational memoirs—bequeathed to her a remarkable gift: the rights to adapt twelve of her early stories into plays and movies. At the time, Moore was in her third year of seminary; she promptly quit in order to attend film school instead.

And she's making it happen. Taking Camilla, a play that L'Engle wrote in her twenties and later revised into a novel, Moore has completed a wonderful film called Camilla Dickinson, which features an impressive, accomplished cast. The film is complete, but doesn't yet have a distributor or release date; Moore and her production company are now pursuing possibilities.

Camilla Who?

To L'Engle fans, Camilla is unfamiliar. But before penning the Time series, her autobiographical Crosswicks Journals, and her reflections on faith and art in Walking on Water, L'Engle wrote coming-of-age novels for young adults. They may not be as strange and speculative as her classics, but they reveal an author finding her voice and unabashedly expressing her passions to the world. (Oprah Winfrey, for one, has taken note: In the July 2009 issue of her O magazine, Camilla was highlighted as one of Oprah's "Summer's Best Reads.")

The story, set in 1948, follows Camilla—a 15-year-old trapped in the turmoil of her parents' failing marriage on New York's Upper East Side. Her mother, Rose, is childlike ...

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March 2012

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