Let Kelly Gissendaner Live
Image: Ben Gray / AP Images
Death penalty opponents gather on the steps of the State Capitol in Atlanta, GA, Monday, March 2, 2015 to protest the death penalty and the planned execution of Kelly Gissendaner.

It sounds like some Georgia state officials are desperately trying every trick in the book to not execute Kelly Gissendaner. Last Wednesday’s scheduled execution was postposed "due to weather and associated scheduling issues," department spokeswoman Gwendolyn Hogan said.

Then last night, the Georgia Department of Corrections issued a statement: “Within the hours leading up to the scheduled execution, the Execution Team performed the necessary checks. At that time, the drugs appeared cloudy. The Department of Corrections immediately consulted with a pharmacist, and in an abundance of caution, Inmate Gissendaner's execution has been postponed."

If these are in fact mere delaying tactics, we wish them success, because the governor of Georgia simply does not have the authority—nor does the Georgia Supreme Court and the State Board of Pardons and Paroles have the desire—to grant clemency.

So we wish God’s speed and success to anyone anywhere in the Georgia Department of Corrections who can delay and/or prevent Kelly Gissendaner from being killed by the state.

Make no mistake, Gissendaner is guilty as guilt can be, as she stated in a clemency petition:

There are no excuses for what I did. I am fully responsible for my role in my husband’s murder. I had become so self-centered and bitter about my life and who I had become, that I lost all judgment. I will never understand how I let myself fall into such evil . . .

So Gissendaner, 46, was duly convicted of plotting to kill her husband, although it was her boyfriend, Gregory Owen, who carried out the gruesome deed in February 1997. Once they were arrested, plea bargains were offered to both to guarantee only life ...

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Let Kelly Gissendaner Live
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