Few contemporary paradoxes are more poignant than that of a generation that regards itself as most sophisticated in other areas and yet involves itself to the tune of millions of dollars in the occult. The proliferation of mystic systems in an era of electronic circuitry, and the fascination astrology holds for the avant-garde, causes one to look for deeper reasons for this curious contradiction in modern life.

Since the announcement that the cast of the rock musical Hair included an astrologer, it seems to have become a status symbol for rock troupes to have an astrologer-psychic in their retinue. More significant, Hair features a song hailing the advent of the Aquarian Age. It seems that this craze may supplant Scientology in its fascination for the psychic community. Certainly it reflects emerging frames of mind.

Let no one think that to its cult the motif of the Aquarian Age is merely whimsical or eccentric. There is solid evidence that many among the architects of our pop culture take with extreme seriousness the division of history into segments ruled over by zodiacal signs. The philosophy of history projected here is about as follows: The 2,000-year period ending with the opening of the Christian era was the Age of Aries, symbolized by a ram, thought to suggest God the Creator. The following 2,000 years, symbolized by the fish and called the Age of Pisces, are considered a sorrowful age, represented by the death of Christ and marked by dissolution, water (tears) being its solvent.

Now, so the theory goes, we are at the dawning of the Age of Aquarius, which has been variously estimated to have begun in 1904 or 1933 or more recently. The Aquarian Age has air as its symbol, and is held to be a sort of new spiritual beginning, ...

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