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Sacrilege Is Real
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Sacrilege Is Real

In February, Pussy Riot, an all-female Russian punk band, entered Christ the Savior Cathedral, the largest Orthodox church in Moscow. They disrupted the service and staged a mock "punk prayer." "Virgin Mary, Mother of God, put Putin away," they sang, adding, "Virgin Mary, Mother of God, become a feminist, become a feminist, become a feminist." They were arrested, tried, and found guilty of "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred." In August, they were sentenced to two years in prison.

Not since Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was sent to Siberia has the West paid so much attention to anything on the Russian cultural scene. Pussy Riot has been extolled as champions of conscience and free expression in the tradition of Joan of Arc and Martin Luther. Support for the band has ranged from secular media elites and aging artists like Madonna and Paul McCartney to the U.S. State Department. Why did this punk prank become a catalyst for international protest?

First, those who believe in democratic reform within the former Soviet Union find little to cheer in the increasingly brutal government of Vladimir Putin. Second, the cozy ties between Putin's state and the Russian Orthodox Church hamstring the church. With all due respect for the Eastern tradition for church-state relations, the Russian Orthodox Church will not become a real voice in civil society until it disentangles itself from state power. Finally, there is the legitimacy of dissent itself. Yet something else is at stake that ought to concern followers of Jesus, something violated by Pussy Riot's antics and almost ignored by their cheerleaders in the West: the sanctity of sacred space.

Orthodox writer Frederica Mathewes-Green ...

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Contra Mundum
Chuck Colson & Timothy George

Charles Colson was the founder of Prison Fellowship Ministries, an outreach to convicts, victims of crime, and justice officers. Colson, who converted to Christianity before he was indicted on Watergate-related charges, became one of evangelicalism's most influential voices. His books included Born Again and How Now Shall We Live? A Christianity Today columnist since 1985, Colson died in 2012.

Timothy George is the dean of Beeson Divinity School at Samford University and a member of Christianity Today's Editorial Council. His books include Reading Scripture with the Reformers and Is the Father of Jesus the God of Muhammad? Like Colson, George has been heavily involved in the Evangelicals and Catholics Together discussions. George began cowriting "Contra Mundum" with Colson in 2011.

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Sacrilege Is Real
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November 2012

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