Guest / Limited Access /
Arguing Against the 'Argument Culture'
Courtesy of Tim Muehlhoff

Blood pumping. Temperature rising. Voices thundering. Anger and confusion. Do all of our conversations about difficult topics—politics, family, finances—need to be this way? Tim Muehlhoff, a marriage expert and professor of communication studies at Biola University, doesn't think so. In I Beg to Differ: Navigating Difficult Conversations with Truth and Love (InterVarsity Press), Muehlhoff charts a path for navigating difficult conversations with grace and truth. Derek Rishmawy, a minister to students and young adults in California, spoke with Muehlhoff about combining modern insights from communication theory with timeless biblical truth.

What makes the subject of communication methods so urgent?

As a culture, we're losing the ability to talk about the deepest things in a tolerant and civil way. That's bleeding down into our personal relationships. Georgetown linguist Deborah Tannen calls it the "argument culture." You see it in American politics any time we try to talk about same-sex marriage, immigration, or other hot-button issues.

We have to find productive ways to communicate with family members, coworkers, and children, whether it's sharing our faith or talking about the kid's schedule that's gotten out of control. This book takes modern research on communication and develops a practical strategy for entering tough conversations in a productive way.

Many of us think that in difficult conversations, the key is to put aside our emotions in order to think "rationally." You say that's a mistake. Why?

Jack Gibb was the first researcher to identify what we call "communication climate." As soon as two people start talking, a communication climate ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Support Christian thought journalism. Donate to our nonprofit ministry today.
From Issue:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Also in this IssueAre Spontaneous Baptisms Healthy for the Church?
Subscriber Access Only Are Spontaneous Baptisms Healthy for the Church?
Steven Furtick's Elevation Church holds spontaneous baptisms. Experts weigh in on the practice.
RecommendedHenri Nouwen’s Weakness Was His Strength
Henri Nouwen’s Weakness Was His Strength
How a gifted, high-achieving spiritual guide learned to share his wounds with others.
TrendingWhy Tim Keller, Max Lucado, and Hundreds of Evangelical Leaders Oppose Trump’s Refugee Ban
Why Tim Keller, Max Lucado, and Hundreds of Evangelical Leaders Oppose Trump’s Refugee Ban
Regardless of court fight’s final outcome, fewer persecuted Christians will make it to America under president’s plan.
Editor's PickChallenging the Narrative: How Race Complicates the Latest LifeWay Debate
Challenging the Narrative: How Race Complicates the Latest LifeWay Debate
Black Southern Baptists weigh in on the issues around removing Sho Baraka’s album.
%%var.bookTitle%%
I Beg to Differ: Navigating Difficult Conversations with Truth and Love
IVP Books
2014-03-28
224 pp., $16.62
Buy %%var.bookTitle%% from Amazon
Christianity Today
Arguing Against the 'Argument Culture'
hide thisApril April

In the Magazine

April 2014

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.