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FROM THE EDITORS

One Sunday last fall, I witnessed two events, stark in their contrast but sharing something significant.

I worshiped that morning at the Cadet Chapel of the United States Military Academy in West Point, New York.

"Chapel" is dramatically underdescriptive of the massive Protestant cathedral, sculpted of stone and overlooking the verdant Hudson River valley. As a worshiper, you're surrounded by stained-glass reminders of Christian history-images of Christ and the disciples, plus saints throughout the centuries.

Above the chancel, light filtered through the glass, spelling out the noble words of military tradition: Duty. Honor. Country.

The service began with the Cadet Choir proceeding down the center aisle as the congregation sang, "I love your kingdom, Lord, / the house of your abode, / the church our blest Redeemer saved / with his own precious blood. "

Then followed a hymn, a prayer of confession, The Lord's Prayer, a reading of Hebrews 4:12-16, and a solo, "Thy word is a lamp unto my feet ...

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