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Selecting Your Key Information Areas, Part Two

What must you know—and what can you safely ignore?

Last issue Kevin Miller reminded you that you don't have to know everything and posed five questions you can ask yourself when you're trying to select your key information areas. Read Part Two below to create your own short list and learn how to stick to it.

Creating your short list

Now you're ready to list your key areas for study, using the chart below. This will be a rough draft; feel free to erase or scratch out as you go. For each area of study, make sure it fits most or all of the 5 criteria:

  • No one else in my team or life can be expert in this; it's something only I can specialize in

  • This area of information can't readily be looked up or obtained elsewhere

  • This is a subject on which I'm making major decisions or will soon

  • The few key people in my work or life depend on me to know this

  • This subject fits my life's calling and strengths.

If you're like me, you will end up with a short list, a modest list, a manageable list. Your goal is to eliminate enough topics so you can concentrate deeply ...

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