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Leader's Insight: Making Good Friday Better

How an abandoned worship practice helped our church recapture the imagination.

"Would it be OK if I took the girls through again?" the young mother asked in a hushed voice, trying not to disturb the others worshipping on Good Friday. Her three school-age daughters batted their eyelashes at me. The mother explained, "This really had an impact on the girls, and they'd like more time at each station to pray and think about the story."

Our Good Friday last year included no sermon, no worship team, no cutting edge technology or lavish drama. Still, people lingered for hours to pray, teenagers returned later in the night with their friends, and children begged their parents for the opportunity to stay longer.

Why?

I believe it's because our church chose to nourish the most emaciated aspect of people's spiritual lives—their imaginations.

Traditionally discipleship has focused upon two areas—knowledge and skills. Churches have poured enormous energy into communicating knowledge about God through preaching, classes, and small groups. Recently an increasing number ...

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