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Review: “Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations”

How can churches embrace a repentant response to a dark side of culture?
Review: “Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations”

Friends – I’m pleased to offer this review of one of the most important ministry-related titles you probably haven’t heard of this year.

Enjoy this response from the estimable Dr. Brandon D. Rhodes, in his PARSE debut. (As an aside: look for Brandon’s first book next year, titled Blip: The Making and Unmaking of the Petrol-Driven Church.) I especially urge you to read Brandon’s summary of postcolonial thought and "response" section below, and begin to ponder how it could impact your life and ministry.Thoughts on where to start? Please share in the comments.– Paul

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"Oh great: another book about white guilt. Ugh."

I’m not proud that those were my first thoughts when Paul Pastor asked me to review Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations: Global Awakenings in Theology and Praxis(IVP, June 2014). But they were. I can recall multiple conversations with postcolonial practitioners whose tone spasmed between smug I’m-so-aware-about-colonialism ...

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