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Churches Without Buildings ...

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Churches Without Buildings ...

Churches Without Buildings - "Church attendance and construction boomed in North America during a time when having your own building was expected. For churches, businesses and families. In my parents’ era, owning real estate was a sign of success, status and stability. So churches that wanted to be seen as reliable and successful bought buildings. Often before there was a congregation to fill them. When someone started their own business, they would leave their house to sit in a building behind a desk all day long—even if every aspect of that business could have been done from their house. The brick-and-mortar building meant reliability and permanence ... Brick-and-mortar may not be dead, but it is on life-support. The church should be leading the way in this idea ... We already lose more churches every year from inability to pay the mortgage than from any other factor." Speaking of buildings ...

The Ecology of Worship Gatherings - Every so often I find an article ...

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