Same-sex marriage has highlighted high-profile relationships between theology, church, state, and society. In June 2015 the Supreme Court issued its Obergefell v. Hodges decision, which ruled that states must allow same-sex couples to marry. A Pew Forum poll before the decision found that most Americans (57%) thought same-sex marriage should be legal, but less than a third of evangelicals agreed. Many are now asking questions about the difference between civil and religious marriage, the place of religious dissent on same-sex marriage, and pastoral care.

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Six Things To Do after the Supreme Court Decision on Gay Marriage
Six Things To Do after the Supreme Court Decision on Gay MarriageSubscriber Access Only
Now is not the time to sulk.
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The Importance of Being Queer
Sex Without BodiesSubscriber Access Only
The church’s response to the LGBT movement must be that matter matters.
Is The Gay Marriage Debate Over?
Is The Gay Marriage Debate Over?Subscriber Access Only
What the battle for traditional marriage means for Americans—and evangelicals.
What God Hath Not Joined
What God Hath Not JoinedSubscriber Access Only
Why marriage was designed for male and female.
Be Careful About Reading the Bible as a Political Guide
Be Careful About Reading the Bible as a Political GuideSubscriber Access Only
Without a mature understanding of God’s purpose for governments, we’ll default to the commonplace views of our culture.
Christians Can’t Back Out of the Foster System Now
Christians Can’t Back Out of the Foster System Now
Bethany CEO: Too many kids need loving families. And that’s why we decided to comply with Michigan’s new requirements.
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