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How to Keep a Youth Minister

Pastors of high schoolers don’t need to graduate each June.

This issue's article for pastor-board discussion deals with a universal concern in the church: youth ministry. Again we suggest that you photocopy this article and distribute it prior to a board meeting, so each of you can bring a contribution regarding its content.

Not every church, of course, has a paid youth pastor- but volunteer youth sponsors are just as subject to discouragement and burnout. With a small bit of adapting, Paul Borthwick's advice will be useful to churches large and small, regardless of staff size.

The youth group at Edgewood Baptist is barely surviving. After the departure of Jim (the third leader in four years), most of the youth are pessimistic. Some, with their families, have started attending the United Methodist church because of its solid youth ministry. Other teenagers have abandoned any aspirations of Christian growth, and they show up at church infrequently.

Jim had come in the fall with high hopes and long-term commitment. Some of the students had been hopeful ...

January/February
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