Ideas that Work


DISCOVERY DAY

Last May, a demographic survey revealed that nearly 70 percent of our people had attended the church only three years or less. So we designated one Sunday in September as "Discovery Day," to help people discover—or rediscover—the church ministries and opportunities to be involved.

Lay ministry leaders hosted tables (booth-type displays) along the sidewalk of our parking lot that Sunday morning. Even our elders hosted a table. In addition, the staff distributed a booklet of the names and telephone numbers of ministry leaders.

I preached an abbreviated sermon (playing off the discovery theme), to leave people time between services to browse at the tables and socialize. We provided refreshments and music in the parking lot. This year, in addition, the children's ministry had a large outdoors gathering for elementary-age kids, sponsoring a speaker from a local professional sports team.

The Discovery Day has done a great job helping new people to get more involved.

Foothills ...

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