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Reaching the Post-Christian

They're today's non-seekers, who've seen Christianity and think they have reasons for rejecting it.

The scene was surreal. In the middle of a busy rush at Starbucks, one of my fellow baristas discovered that my "real job" was working at a church down the street. Acting as if she had never come in contact with a live pastor before, she began squealing with delight, telling every customer and employee of her discovery.

This revelation caused a spontaneous spiritual combustion at the store, and I listened as a group of people circled around the espresso bar and regaled me with stories of their spiritual history.

Selma went first: "I think Christianity has an important place in society. I don't personally follow it, but I figure, whatever makes you happy, do it."

Matt quickly followed, revealing the painful interactions he had experienced: "Christianity is for simple-minded people. When they talk to you, they act as if you are a robot. They have an agenda to promote, and if you don't agree with them, they're done with you."

Tatia thought about Matt's comments for a moment, and then added her ...

From Issue:Fall 2004: Keeping Conflict Healthy
January/February
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