Jump directly to the Content

Building Below the Water Line

Shoring up the parts of leadership nobody (but God) sees.

Editor's note: Each month, Gordon MacDonald shares from his journals his recent reflections on his reading, preaching, travels, and life.

Picked up in a Vermont "used book" store: David McCullough's The Great Bridge (Simon and Schuster, 1972). As usual McCullough (among the best of modern writers) tells a great story, this time of the building of the Brooklyn Bridge, which arched the East River and joined Manhattan to Brooklyn.

In June 1872, the Chief Engineer of the project wrote: "To such of the general public as might imagine that no work had been done on the New York tower, because they see no evidence of it above the water, I should simply remark that the amount of the masonry and concrete laid on that foundation during the past winter, under water, is equal in quantity to the entire masonry of the Brooklyn tower visible today above the water line" (italics mine).

The Brooklyn Bridge remains a major transportation artery in New York City today because, 135 years ago, the Chief Engineer ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe to Christianity Today magazine. Subscribers have full digital access to CT Pastors articles.

July/August
Support Our Work

Subscribe to CT for less than $4.25/month

Homepage Subscription Panel

Read These Next

Related
Worship Leaders, We Are Not Rock Stars
Worship Leaders, We Are Not Rock Stars
Leadership Journal Reviews
From the Magazine
Disasters Often Bring Revelation Rather than Punishment
Disasters Often Bring Revelation Rather than Punishment
An 18th-century earthquake and a 21st-century pandemic can teach us about enlightenment and judgment.
Editor's Pick
When Churches Put Love at the Center
When Churches Put Love at the Center
How "beloved community" helps us envision tangible ways to embody kingdom values.
close