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From Frantic to Fantastic

I love Starbucks coffee. However, I can't imagine how people can visit their neighborhood Starbucks to read a book, work on a project, or to just relax.

I love Starbucks coffee. However, I can't imagine how people can visit their neighborhood Starbucks to read a book, work on a project, or just relax.

I grew up in a big city, and still lived there until a month ago. So the only Starbucks I know exists as over-crowded, under-staffed, and mighty loud. The coffee tastes great, but the atmosphere is absolutely frantic.

Surprisingly, what I hadn't realized until recently is that I'd come to enjoy this crazy setting. In fact, I've grown to expect it. Why? Because the appearance of craziness behind the counter makes me think things are actually getting done.

I certainly don't intend to sound somewhat strange, but I love standing in line knowing the employees are near exhaustion as they work to serve me as fast as possible. It's reassuring as they run from the pastry cabinet to refilling the brewed coffee to working the cappuccino machine in seamless motion. And if the barista doesn't have at least three drinks in the works at once, I think something's ...

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