Jump directly to the Content

Coaching from the Sideline

Instead of providing answers to problems, this mentoring strategy guides people to devise their own plays.

Carlos called me in a panic. His ministry was suffocating him and his mind was filled with thoughts of leaving. He'd waited until late afternoon to call, and I had thoughts of getting home to mow the lawn. I did not have time to let him cry on my shoulder (or in my ear, as the phone would have it). So I put forth the blunt question I reserve for need-seekers: "Why are you calling me?"

The truth was he was looking for a job connection. I considered hanging up. But rather than send him away empty-handed, I offered to coach him through the situation. I'd recently completed a certification process for coaching, and I figured I could practice my new skills on Carlos with little risk of botching it. After all, he was already prepared to leave the ministry. How much worse could I make it?

He responded to my invitation to coach him with a question of his own: "What's coaching?"

Basics of the game

Coaching assumes that a unique "solution seed" lies within every challenge. This seed simply needs to ...

December
Support Our Work

Subscribe to CT for less than $4.25/month

Homepage Subscription Panel

Read These Next

Related
Firehouse Accountability
Firehouse Accountability
There has to be a better way to look out for each other.
From the Magazine
Bible Apps Are the New Printing Press
Bible Apps Are the New Printing Press
How evangelical computer programmers changed the way we read Scripture.
Editor's Pick
To Be a Pastor Is to Know Betrayal
To Be a Pastor Is to Know Betrayal
Apprenticing Jesus in a cruciform call.
close