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You're a Genius

A review of Multipliers

I'm not big on business books. You're more likely to catch me reading Nouwen or Newbigin than Collins or Covey. So when a friend said I "had to" read Multipliers, I did so reluctantly.

I'm glad I did.

Toward the beginning of the book, author Liz Wiseman asks, "Do you want to be a genius or a genius maker?" Her definition of genius doesn't require high IQ or exceptional knowledge; it's about reproducing life change in others. True geniuses make other geniuses.

We tend to think movements are led by brash visionaries, but Wiseman debunks this notion. She explains how movement makers are usually people humble enough to live a life bigger than themselves.

She also writes about "diminishers," people whose pride limits the capability of those around them. Having a "diminisher" at the helm can spell doom for an organization. "As we studied Diminishers we heard case after case of smart individuals being underutilized by their leaders ... We learned that it is indeed possible to be both overworked and ...

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