Jump directly to the Content

The Multi-Cultural Conundrum

Even multiracial congregations tend to have white cultural values. Can we continue to cultivate truer diversity in the body of Christ?
The Multi-Cultural Conundrum

Tiffany stood behind the counter waiting for the next customer. I stepped up and we talked. She told me she had just moved to Jackson, Mississippi, from a tiny town in the Delta. She was a single mother with one child and had been raised in the church. I mustered up all my evangelical boldness and invited her to our congregation.

"The preaching is great," I said. "The pastor sticks to the Bible. The people are welcoming and would love to meet you." Then I felt compelled to explain a bit more. I didn't want Tiffany to show up and be unpleasantly surprised.

"I just want you to know," I began, "Our church is intentionally multiracial." She stared back at me with a blank expression. I quickly added, "The pastor is black, and the music is excellent. It may not be what you're used to, but just come for a visit."

Tiffany is African American. So am I. Why, then, did I feel sheepish about inviting her to my church, where I am a ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe to Christianity Today magazine. Subscribers have full digital access to CT Pastors articles.

Homepage Subscription Panel

Read These Next

Related
The Wrong Boogeyman (Part 2)
The Wrong Boogeyman (Part 2)
Should we be advocating earlier marriage to boost church attendance?
From the Magazine
Paul’s Letter to a Prejudiced Church
Paul’s Letter to a Prejudiced Church
How the apostle’s instructions on the Lord’s Supper speak to multiethnic congregations today.
Editor's Pick
Read Your Bible Through a Kaleidoscope
Read Your Bible Through a Kaleidoscope
Multicolored scholarship expands biblical interpretation beyond traditional Eurocentric perspectives.
close