Father Sava Janjic is one of the very few advocates of reconciliation and peaceful co-existence in Kosovo. During the NATO bombings, which began a year ago on March 23, 1999, Sava became world-famous as the "cyber-monk," thanks to his Internet site on which he not only informed the cyber-community world-wide about what was happening in Kosovo but also pleaded with all sides in the conflict to negotiate a solution.Kosovo's famous monastery at Decani, where he then lived, gave shelter, food and clothing to many ethnic Albanian refugees forced to flee the violence of Serbian soldiers and paramilitaries, setting an example for others in the midst of atrocities.But very few followed that example, however, and Sava is pessimistic about the future.He told Ecumenical News International (ENI), during a recent visit by journalists to Kosovo arranged by the World Council of Churches in Geneva, that for Kosovo's Serbian citizens the situation was worse today than immediately after the arrival of the KFOR, the international peace-keeping force, last year.Sava was speaking to ENI at the monastery where he now lives, in Grajinica, 15 kilometers from Pristina, Kosovo's main city.Following KFOR's arrival in Kosovo at the end of 11 weeks of intensive bombing by NATO forces, ethnic Albanians, angry at the destruction and carnage inflicted on them, forced tens of thousands of Serbs out of the province.Sava, who has spoken of the need by Serbs here to recognize the injustices perpetrated against the ethnic Albanians, complained to ENI that "the presence of 50,000 KFOR soldiers from the best armies in the world, as well as several dozen human rights non-governmental organizations, have not been able to protect us."With the exception of the town ...

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