John Shelby Spong, the retired Episcopal (Anglican) bishop whose name has become synonymous with "controversy" because of his radical views, is to write a column on religion and sexuality for a new Web site—theposition.com—which is now under construction and due to be launched June 5. Bishop Spong, whom one New York tabloid newspaper has already dubbed "the Bishop of Cybersex," will argue in his first column that the Ten Commandments were written, in part at least, to sexually repress women. The Web site magazine is "about sexuality, but it is not pornographic," according to a letter signed by the Web site's editor-in-chief, Jack Heidenry (a former editor at Penthouse and Maxim magazines), and emailed to Episcopal dioceses. "Our goal is to discuss all aspects of sexuality—political, cultural, artistic—in an intelligent, objective manner, in the same way that other magazines devote their contents to the discussion of politics, the arts, religion, and so on." The site will be owned by the forthcoming Museum of Sex. Bishop Spong will join a line-up of prominent public figures, such as American Civil Liberties Union president Nadine Strossen and Pulitzer Prize-winner Richard Rhodes, contributing to the Web site. Now a guest lecturer at Harvard University, Bishop Spong told Associated Press that his column was designed to seriously address issues of religion and sex. "I'm a little bit concerned that some people are treating this as some sort of salacious thing," he said. "It's an attempt to discuss sexuality in a serious way."On May 21, 60 Minutes, a popular television news program, devoted a 15-minute segment to Bishop Spong, who retired as Bishop of Newark, New Jersey, in January after 24 years, but continues to stir debate ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.