Sounds like … a sophisticated blend of modern pop with traditional worship, reflecting the unique sounds of all the talented artists involved

At a Glance … this is a fabulous worship album highlighted by smart artist pairings — it's very creative and yet accessible to all listeners' tastes.

When it comes to movies, a lot of us love sequels because we know exactly what we're getting, and we can usually expect more of the things that endeared the first film to us. But at the same time, we also know sequels are rarely creative and artistic — they're usually little more than a rehashing of the original formula. When it comes to music, sequels are even more suspect because you typically get an album that tries to imitate the first, resulting in a stale and inferior project. Sometimes, however, you get a music series such as MTV's Unplugged, which maintains creativity over several albums. A musical series like that works because it forces the artists to conform to a certain set of guidelines while still adding their own musical imprint to the series. It also succeeds in creating a sense of artistic community among the artists — everyone from Eric Clapton and Mariah Carey to Maxwell and Kiss has appeared on Unplugged. This successful notion of collaboration and community seems to be working for City on a Hill: Sing Alleluia, an album so good it actually improves upon the original. If you've heard the first, you know this is no small feat.

Like the first disc, Sing Alleluiais a blend of modern pop/folk. In some ways it's edgier and grittier sounding than the first, yet it's also more traditional in its sound. If you recall, the first disc closes with church bells playing "All Creatures of Our God and ...

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City on a Hill: Sing Alleluia
Our Rating
4½ Stars - Excellent
Average Rating
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Release Date
February 19, 2002
Label
Essential Records
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